Planning matters

Our award winning blog gives a fresh perspective on the latest trends in planning and development.

Making an impact: measuring economic contribution in the property sector
By providing the essential investment to support and drive economic growth, we all know that the development industry makes a hugely important contribution to the UK economy. But relatively few organisations can point to specific evidence or tangible examples of the wider benefits delivered by their day-to-day activities and operations. The concept of measuring the social and economic impacts of corporate activities has, however, started to attract greater focus and attention within the development sector. Leading organisations increasingly want to take a strategic perspective of the contribution they make to the national and local economy through their development portfolios and investments. Within a competitive and often crowded marketplace, they are coming to realise that to effectively influence stakeholders requires a clear and compelling narrative, justified by a robust and objective evidence base. At Lichfields, we work with some of the largest and most successful companies in the sector including commercial developers, housebuilders, retailers and industry bodies, to help them assess their economic contribution. Friday we were delighted to launch our most recent collaboration with Landsec, the UK’s largest listed commercial property company, having supported them to measure their sizeable contribution to the UK economy for the first time. The findings show Landsec’s annual contribution to the UK economy through buying, selling, building and managing commercial property.   But with so much to potentially cover and include, where’s the best place to start? I’ve set out some key questions for any organisation thinking about how to measure their contribution: 1) What’s the best way of analysing the value created by an organisation? For large companies, there is often a case to break down activity by specific divisions or geographical trading areas. Some examples include: Company-wide activity (e.g. Landsec’s UK operations); Divisional (or regional) operations (e.g. Barratt David Wilson Southern Region); A portfolio of sites, assets or developments (e.g. Manor Royal Business District); Individual development schemes (e.g. Long Marston Airfield); and Industry-wide activities (e.g. UK house building). 2) Who is the target audience and what are the key messages to convey? This will determine the types of impacts and metrics to explore, as well as the outputs required. Once the added value generated by a business has been quantified, this can be applied in a number of contexts including corporate social responsibility reporting, communicating wider value to stakeholders (such as investors, local councils, government) and providing differentiation from competitors (for example within competitive bidding situations). This could focus on ‘real time’ impacts such as revenue generated for UK plc as well as longer term impacts such as investing in the workforce and local communities (e.g. supporting people to (re)enter the labour market). 3) What input data is available? Think about what kind of data and information is already held in-house (for example on a company ledger or payroll) and what might need to be captured through primary data collection or surveys. For many of our clients when undertaking this exercise for the first time, this can help to shine a light on the type, scale and quality of a wide range of company data and often helps to improve and streamline internal systems going forward. In reality we find that it’s an evolving process, with the range of metrics reported expanding and diversifying over time. Our analytical framework is flexible and scalable, and draws on the latest data and national best practice to consider socio-economic contribution across a range of direct, indirect and wider impacts including creating jobs and expenditure, supporting public resources and services and building sustainable communities (Figure 1). Figure 1: Socio-economic impact framework Source: Lichfields This provides an opportunity to look beyond the obvious metrics (such as number of people directly employed by an organisation) to quantify the value supported across the wider supply chain and economy. For instance, the ‘catalytic’ and place-making role played by major developments, such as kick starting the regeneration of a town centre or unlocking a new piece of transport infrastructure to enhance connectivity and consequently enable an area to secure additional investment. 4) What is the most effective and impactful way of presenting the results? This will partly depend on the intended audience, and it may be that a suite of different outputs are required. We have used our experience and polished suite of graphics tools to communicate key messages in a visually appealing way, through clear and user-friendly outputs such as infographic summaries, interactive tools and creative, engaging reports (some examples below). What’s clear is that more of the development sector’s key players are realising the value that comes from measuring and communicating their total economic impact, and we expect to see a growing appetite over the coming months as government looks to secure new sector deals. At Lichfields we are well placed to help and simplify the process, drawing on our market-leading expertise and unparalleled track record of economic impact assessment, as well as our ‘tried and tested’ tools that have been independently reviewed and verified. Please get in touch to find out more and to discuss how we can help. Image credit: Loop Imaged Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo

CONTINUE READING

Planning for inward investment in a world of uncertainty
A fundamental role of planning is to provide land of the right type in the right location to balance the need for new development with the interests of local communities and the wider public. The key challenge though is to recognise current and emerging growth opportunities and ensure that local plans are sufficiently flexible to be able to accommodate the full spectrum of opportunities, from small scale extensions and change of use through to identifying strategic sites capable of accommodating inward investment from external sources.The recent chain of events triggered by the UK’s decision to leave the EU has placed a renewed focus on how localities position themselves for economic growth and ensuring that the various planning systems across the UK are ‘fit-for-purpose’ to secure future prosperity.Inward investment represents just one source of growth and development, yet it remains one of the more challenging to quantify and plan for, given its ‘footloose’ nature. The extent to which local areas can actively plan for – and successfully capture – inward investment can also vary considerably across the country.To explore how planning for inward investment works in local areas and how local partners can be more pro-active in securing these opportunities, NLP recently carried out a survey of local planning authorities (LPAs) and local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) across England. The key messages are presented in our new research report Invest to Grow and are summarised below: Growth begins at home: 88% of LPA and 100% of LEP respondents thought working with existing businesses and investors was a particularly effective way of supporting and encouraging inward investment in a local area, underlining the valuable role that domestic investors play in expanding their existing presence within the UK. ‘Oven-ready’ sites are crucial: The most significant barrier to attracting and securing inward investment comes from the various factors that hold up development, such as infrastructure costs required to make sites ‘oven ready’ for development - this was cited as a significant barrier by 83% of LPAs and 100% of LEPs. Planning can have a role to play in shaping the strategy and funding mechanisms required to help overcome these barriers and unlock development opportunities ready for investment. Clarity on inward investment strategies: Global competition for inward investment can be fierce and within the UK a handful of sectors are repeatedly being targeted by local areas, for example through the designation of Enterprise Zones and through allocated City Deal funding (see Figure below). This makes it increasingly important for local areas to develop their strategies around their indigenous sector strengths, clusters and ‘USPs’. Work together: A 4.good level of awareness exists amongst LPAs and LEPs of the strategy for inward investment in their area and supporting local growth, but a third of LEPs and 60% of LPAs thought there was room for more collaboration between their respective organisations on planning for inward investment. This suggests there is significant scope for more effective, joined-up working between partners. Drawing on best practice examples, we have identified a series of critical success factors that local partners could use to shape appropriate planning policy responses to inward investment opportunities in their area. This distils the opportunity into three broad typologies (described below) and provides a useful way of thinking about how the planning system can more pro-actively target and help capture inward investment within the overall ambit of planning for growth.‘Grow your own’ – the first typology - refers to companies that already have a UK base and have scope to expand their operations either in the same location and/or elsewhere across the country. Responding to this opportunity is all about taking the time to understand and nurture an existing business base, ensuring they have the support they need to become more embedded within a local economy and being responsive to expansion and development plans to ensure that their growth can be accommodated.    Source: NLP Analysis ‘Catch and steer’ – the second typology - describes firms that have already decided to bring their investment to the UK or a particular region and are exploring their location, site and premises options. Planning has a role to play here in establishing a clear and competitive sector offer, by providing planning certainty that key sites are available and deliverable, and contributing to making the economic case for public funding to unlock development opportunities.    Source: NLP Analysis ‘Footloose and free’ - the final typology - relates to firms that are not tied to any particular location or country but operate within a global marketplace. This arguably represents the most difficult opportunity to plan for, so maintaining a flexible and responsive planning system that anticipates (rather than accurately predicts) where opportunities might derive from is key, alongside promoting a positive message to the global marketplace that a local area is ‘open for business’. This will help an area to respond effectively if, or as and when the time comes.    Source: NLP Analysis Our research shows that planning for inward investment inevitably looks different in different places, but with the EU Referendum result already impacting on business decisions to invest and trade with the UK, it also indicates that the ability of local areas to make themselves attractive to inward investment - and the opportunities that this can bring - is now more important than ever.Download a copy of Invest to Grow here.

CONTINUE READING