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Places, People and Planning - Position Statement
Doing it for the kids… Picture the scene, it’s the 29th June 2017, the schools are breaking up for the summer, so the weather has taken a turn for the worst, but have our thoughts turned to summer and lazy days soaking up some rays? Not us Scottish planners.  The ‘Places, People and Planning - Position Statement’ has just dropped (view here) and we have until the 11th August to comment, 11 days before the kids return to school for next term… no rest for the wicked I suppose… The Position Statement is clear that Scottish Government wants to give people an opportunity to plan their own place.  In particular, increasing the involvement of young people is a commitment, including changes to the existing requirements for engagement to ensure that children and young people are specifically encouraged to be more involved in planning.  Also there is a commitment to achieving a real shift away from consultation towards more meaningful community empowerment within the planning system. Thinking about what to do with kids during the long summer holidays made me think about this proposition that they should be more involved in the planning process.  Although I am pretty sure that given the choice, writing a Local Place Plan over the summer or responding to a consultation on a Local Development Plan wouldn’t be top of their list in terms of summer fun!  But why not… plan-making doesn’t have to be boring! So, what is the current “position” on this?  Well, Young Scot ran an online survey as part of the Planning Review process and this has also been published (view here). It isn’t surprising that the response rate was low, only 104 usable responses. Incidentally the population of 11-25 year olds in Scotland, the target audience for the survey, is around 960,000 (NRS 2016 mid-year estimates).  Herein is the real challenge… how do we convince young people that they actually want to be involved, as much as the Scottish Government wants them to be? So here it is my proposition, for what it is worth…  (can anyone else hear the collective groan of 11-25 year olds across Scotland?). Local Place Planning Summer Camp…  Base camp should be in the heart of the community, an empty shop on the high street or in a community centre for example. Activities are set for each week of the summer holidays that are all about evidence gathering and the development of proposals for the place.  As an aside it strikes me that a parallel process should also be run with older people who have the time and inclination to be involved in such things.  Starting with the accepted facts – population, age demographics, household numbers, household sizes, employment rates and travel to work information supplied by the Local Council - the “campers” can start to think about what is needed for the future of their place.  Health checks of local facilities and services including who uses them and what improvements are needed to increase use will provide local ‘on the ground’ knowledge.  Parking surveys, looking at safe walking routes, and thinking about public transport could all be part of this activity.  Thought should be given to social, economic and environmental matters.  Topics such as Environment, Facilities and Services, Housing, Jobs, Transport should have a week-long programme each.  If an empty shop unit is being used as base camp then the work in progress should be displayed in the windows (if not, another public place should be found) and posted on social media.  Comment should be sought and discussion should be ongoing.  The whole process should culminate in a plan-making extravaganza where the gained knowledge is shared and policies, proposals and actions for the place plan debated.  This should be run by the “campers” but involve wider community interest groups including community councils.  It should be facilitated by the Local Council and should involve their policy planners.  The end product should be a draft local place plan that can then be consulted on in local schools and with local residents and other stakeholders.  The consultations would be led by the young people (and if there was a parallel process the older people) involved in the preparation of the draft local place plan. Clearly for the plan to have legal status it will need to be tested in terms of impact and for conformity with the adopted development plans. This should be undertaken by the Local Council and any necessary revisions debated in an open forum.  Whether local place plans in Scotland would need to be examined and have a local referendum such as is the case for the English neighbourhood development plans would also need to be given proper thought through the ongoing planning review process that is leading up to the draft Planning Bill. - Nicola Woodward is Head of our Edinburgh office, mother of an 11 year old daughter (who wants to be an elephant doctor not a planner) and is a former Head of Planning Policy which explains her need to share her love of plan-making!

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Scottish Planning Review

Scottish Planning Review

Nicola Woodward 22 Mar 2017
On 20th March the Scottish Planning Review Working Groups reconvened for a further round of discussions. This time the focus was on the Scottish Government’s published response to the Review, ‘Places, People and Planning: A consultation of the future of the Scottish Planning System’, which is out for consultation until the 4th April. I was delighted to attend again and share my experiences of plan making; and of, establishing, defending and challenging of housing targets. I was even more delighted to be asked by the Scottish Government to facilitate the Delivering More Homes session on “…how much housing is required and establishing demand for housing…”. The reconvened workshop looked at two key aspects of Places, People and Planning. The first workshop session considered the ways in which design/place and delivery can be actively supported by proposed changes in the system. The purpose of the first workshop was to focus on how planning can help to diversify the ways in which we deliver homes. This considered the proposals from the consultation paper that aim to deliver more homes under the headings Actively Enabling Development – diversifying how we deliver homes and the types of homes that we deliver, and providing improved practical tools, such as SPZs. The second workshop session (which I facilitated) provided the opportunity to clarify the proposed process of establishing the demand for housing in the LDP, the role of the proposed gate-check and the translating of this into land and sites as part of a strong place-making aim. The purpose of the second workshop was to focus on the potential changes set out in the consultation – using the HNDA tool to provide national/regional estimates; signing off the number of homes at an early stage in plan production by the gatecheck, and improving monitoring of housing land availability. It was a pretty tall order to expect a solution to be provided in a 2 hour session but there was a clear call for unambiguous housing numbers to be set at the national level so that at a local level the business of plan making and quality of place could be achieved with less distraction. There was broad discussion about how these numbers would be set and how often they would be reviewed, always with an eye to the ambition of simplifying not further complicating the process. The NRS projections adjusted to take account of the economic growth ambitions of Scottish Government seemed to be a sensible starting point. But how often should these be reviewed? There are new projections every 2 years, surely it isn’t sensible to revise the national housing numbers as often as that? There was a clear consensus that the number set should be expressed as an “at least” and that via the regional arrangements and Local Development Plans there would be the flexibility to exceed this number if local circumstances supported that. The maintenance of a regional tier of planning was supported. If the current SDP process must change then it was thought important that the regional tier became the link between the nationally set requirements and the translation of those into Local Development Plans. This regional tier would deal with the requirements of the housing market areas and would ensure the cross boundary working that was needed between individual LAs to deliver the ambitions of the national plan. It was felt that there was still the need for this regional tier to produce a set of requirements for their constituent LAs to deliver, even if this wasn’t a full SDP and that this should be signed off at the highest level of each LA. There also seemed to be a role for the regional tier in the “gatecheck”. This was seen to be ensuring that where proposals in the national plan crossed LA boundaries there was a mechanism to ensure each LA was planning properly for their contribution to this bigger picture. What was clear from these discussions was that there should be a drive to get the numbers fixed and signed off at the highest level. For this to streamline the process there must be agreement that once the numbers are set they are fixed, otherwise there is the danger that housing numbers will be discussed and scrutinised 3 times at national, regional and local levels. Whatever new process is that is put in place it needs to be mindful of the necessity to avoid this.The discussions at these workshop sessions will feed into Scottish Government’s thinking as they refine their approach and revise the system ahead of legislative changes. The consultation remains open and all that have a stake in the Scottish Planning System are encouraged to make representations by 4th April. If you require Lichfields to make representations on your behalf get in touch soon, the clock is ticking…

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