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Paint the town incredible

Paint the town incredible

Clare Dolan 26 Sep 2017
Last weekend I attended talks given by a variety of designers speaking at the London Design Festival. These graphic designers and artists all had something in common: their work being used by the public – whether that was as immersive public art, murals, way finding, or branding a pop-up embassy.   One of the speakers, Camille Walala, had livened up Exchange Square, Broadgate with her use of strong colour, bold shapes and an inflatable castle (why not?).   Camille hoped that ‘Villa Walala’ would “introduce a sense of the unexpected” into what is usually a corporate environment filled with “suits” and surrounded by tall offices and backing off Liverpool Street station. She also said, "I think that, to turn a corner into Broadgate, and find a huge, bouncy, pink and patterned house will be hugely entertaining.”[1]               Much of Camille’s work involves her Memphis Group-inspired bright shapes and colours, overlaid onto building facades and her designs always evoke a sense of fun and playfulness. Visitors to her current exhibition at the Now Gallery (inspired by hall of mirrors amusements) have said that it gave them the experience of being a child again. It’s had a very positive response, proven by the need to now ticket the exhibition since it has continued to grow hour-long queues.   Another talk I went to was by Michael Beirut from Pentagram, who worked on the branding of Hillary Clinton's election campaign. Another of his many projects I'll mention involved working on the environmental graphics for over 60 libraries in public schools across New York City. Because the book shelves had to be only so high for the children, they were offered a lot of wall space to play with. Murals were painted onto the library walls - a different artist for every library - and each reflected their school's own character and community. The murals have therefore given the pupils and librarians a better sense of belonging and ownership.   Colour can be a huge part of a place’s identity. If you look at the beautiful pastel-coloured houses of Cornwall, the colourful coastal homes of Cinque Terre, Stockholm’s bright old town of Gamla Stan, the royal blue Jardin Majorelle of Marrakech or the detailed facades of houses on Haight Street, San Francisco – all of these make up a big part of their city or region’s identity and are a draw for tourists too. Studies show that colour can affect our mood and influence our decision making in all environments [2], as written about in The Architecture of Happiness, so why wouldn’t we want to make our streets more colourful and vibrant?   To name a few colourful projects Lichfields has worked on, The Old Vinyl Factory has the Converse Wall of Clash mural on the Powerhouse which brings the disused building to life and there is also a wrap around Cabinet Building of Beatles mania. Part of The Deptford Project, The Rogers Stirk Harbour eight storey residential building located alongside the listed carriage ramp features brightly coloured privacy screens and overlooks a public market area.   Within London, here are a few colourful places I like:       Could our happiness be improved with more colourful buildings or public art in our neighbourhoods? With the help of the Government and local authorities working closely with artists and designers to represent local communities, I believe we would feel the difference.   Sadiq Khan has pledged to support 25 community-led projects through his Crowdfund London initiative, investing more than £400,000. These include light installations in Southall, and conversion of a disused rail line into a public park and green link. He says that, “our shared mission is to empower as many people as possible to shape their city. We believe that if we can achieve that, people will feel a stronger sense of local belonging, and that the places we create together will better serve the needs and aspirations of Londoners.”[3] Also coming soon, will be some public art to coincide with Battersea Power Station’s redevelopment. Jude Kelly (artistic director of the Southbank Centre and arts adviser for Battersea Power Station) wants a 3km “arts corridor” along the river featuring new artworks[4].   London Design Festival is on annually with events, talks and exhibitions across the city. Footnotes:  [1] http://www.londondesignfestival.com/node/7116 [2] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dylan-kendall/how-to-be-happy_b_650578.html [3] https://www.london.gov.uk/press-releases/mayoral/sadiq-khan-invests-over-400k-in-local-projects[4] http://www.homesandproperty.co.uk/home-garden/interiors/design-news/the-worst-and-best-public-art-springing-up-near-new-homes-from-mayfair-to-battersea-a112586.html#gallery

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3D printing in construction, health and manufacturing
It’s one of those internet memes that appears on social media every once in a while, but it’s hard to track down the first iteration but it essentially goes like this: It gets a chuckle from me every time, swiftly followed by memories of the clunking staccato rhythm of loading a floppy disk into my first PC home (it still doesn’t beat the noise of loading a cassette tape-based game into the old BBC Acorns but I fear I may be showing my age now). Nostalgic memories aside, the meme confirms that 3D printing is slowly becoming a well-established, socially recognised technology medium. It’s a technology that is on the cusp of simultaneously shaping multiple industries and is destined to change the definition of design, manufacturing, construction, retail, medicine and space exploration. It’s also one of those technologies that I’m a self-confessed fan of and follow its progress as avidly as some like to watch their local team play football. This blog sets out how 3D printing will soon impact on three industries – construction, retail, and health, and how it will become as standard as the floppy disc drive once was!   Construction Industrial 3-D printing is at a tipping point, about to go mainstream in a big way. Most executives and many engineers don’t realise it, but this technology has moved well beyond prototyping, rapid tooling, trinkets, and toys. Harvard Business Review   Image Source: Total Kustom The construction industry has been doing the same thing for well over a hundred years now. Houses for example are still very much set to rectangular standardised plans, mostly built from single materials joined together by mortar and nails, and constructed over a number of weeks. Not for much longer. Say hello to the Rudenko 3D printer which is a gantry-based concrete extrusion printer. Rudenko is one of a growing number of start-up companies using concrete to print structures such as the above example of a castle, or the World’s first 3D printed hotel suite. The castle was very much a proof of concept for the makers and took around 3 months to print back in 2014. However the technology is moving fast. How fast? Well the below example of a 3D printed house prototype was printed earlier this year. But the most impressive part of the house isn’t just the fact that it was 3D printed, it’s that it only took 24 hours to print. It’s no longer a giant leap to imagine a similar system employed by housebuilders in the coming years. If we could turn these systems into a mobile platform (some of which already are), housebuilders could one day park up a printer, programme it with designs for a row of houses (houses which could have been designed by the future residents, to perfectly match their needs and wants) and away it would go. It could greatly speed up house building, which could minimise disruption to the surrounding area and boost affordable housing provision. In addition it could open up a whole new market of custom homes, allowing prospective home owners to tell the housebuilders how they want their house to look and what the layout should be.    Its potential for house builders is obvious but it could go much further than that. Such a system could also be deployed to disaster zones to quickly build shelters to house those who have lost their homes.   Manufacturing & Retail Image Source: PC Advisor Any rail traveller or music lover knows it’s far more convenient and easier to simply print your tickets rather than collecting them at the station or waiting for them to arrive in the post. Convenience can be a killer of the high street shop however. Just as the rise of the digitally downloaded album or movie saw a corresponding fall in high street sales and ultimately a swathe of retailers like HMV closing stores, other retailers could soon feel the effects of 3D printing as it will ultimately change the way we purchase our goods. This would foreseeably have a knock-on effect on supply lines and the need for a physical high street presence. With more and more materials being developed for use with 3D printing and more 3D printers having the capability to print multiple materials simultaneously,  the idea of on-demand printing of products no longer seems to far-fetched. Home 3D printing has many advantages over the more traditional retail models. Why go to the shops to replace the broken door handle when you could just print a replacement at home? Or why stand in the cold and rain waiting for the latest iPhone when you could just pay apple direct for a download link and print it yourself? And even if the convenience of not having to physically go to the shops isn’t a selling point for consumers, the ability to then customise those products are virtually limitless. Imagine being able to print a pair of shoes that are customised - from the colour and style right down to a perfect fit for your foot.  Health 3D printing is making a noticeable impact in hospitals across the world. In Birmingham for example, the Queen Elizabeth Hospital recently announced that it is saving an average of 3 to 4 hours and £20,000 per surgery by printing 3D models of patients’ organs using their new in-house 3D printer so that doctors and surgeons can see what needs doing before ever picking up a scalpel. Final thoughts If I were to take one thing away from this blog, it’s that I’m going to be buying a 3D printer for my daughter for Christmas soon. Why? Because we are in the early days of 3D printing and like my old BBC Acorn, they are expensive and have limited functionality. However it’s those limitations that encouraged the Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and Tim Berners-Lee’s of the world to start playing with the technology, developing new programming languages and new ways of using it. It’s my feeling that it will be the kids of today who grow up with these 3D printers in their homes and schools who will really push the technology in the next 10/20 years - and jobs in the industry will increase in number exponentially. It’s a technology that is here, and must not be ignored.

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