Planning matters

Our award winning blog gives a fresh perspective on the latest trends in planning and development.

Putting the ‘local’ into industrial strategy
The dust has now settled on the Government’s eagerly-awaited Industrial Strategy, published back in November 2017 to unveil a long term plan to build a Britain “fit for the future” (for a handy summary of its highlights see our Insight Focus and previous blog). Framed by four bold and ambitious ‘Grand Challenges’, the Industrial Strategy also defines some more immediate, short term deliverables in an attempt to galvanise different places across the country to respond to the national imperative and priority to boost productivity. The most pressing of these is the requirement for Local Industrial Strategies to be brought forward by Mayoral Combined Authorities (MCAs) and Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) (or devolved administrations in Scotland and Wales). These should set out a plan for how local leaders and businesses will work together to deliver growth. The first are expected by March 2019 and we have seen considerable progress being made up and down Britain to work them up. Local Industrial Strategies will become an important mechanism for places to ‘broker’ a favourable deal with Government for the resources they need to enable growth and development over the coming years. In many cases, the geography covered by these Local Industrial Strategies will extend to sub-regions, growth ‘corridors’ and large metropolitan areas, so a key challenge will be showcasing a collective economic vision and cohesive plan for growth. This means that local partners – namely local authorities – have a strong incentive to engage with MCAs, LEPs and devolved administrations to proactively steer the development of local strategies to ensure their specific economic priorities and growth opportunities are given the prominence they need. But in a competitive environment – where those who ‘shout loudest’ often win – local authorities need to be armed with robust evidence, a convincing narrative and a well-articulated case; avoid getting bogged down in detail and instead focus on concise and impactful justification. Above all, the onus is on individual authorities or groups of authorities working together to mobilise now during this current window of opportunity – while there is still time to influence and make a difference. We have identified 4 key ‘building blocks’ for successful Local Industrial Strategies, summarised below. In our new product brochure, we provide some ideas on how local authorities can proactively shape the development of Local Industrial Strategies for their area, alongside some practical examples of the types of evidence and outputs that could be used to support this process.        This provides a useful way of thinking about the best means of interacting with the Local Industrial Strategy process. For instance, you might already have a good understanding of those industrial clusters of particular or unique economic significance in your local area, but need to demonstrate their full economic value in a ‘tangible’ way (see our recent example for Manor Royal Business District in Crawley). Equally, you might have a long ‘wish list’ of local projects and priority schemes but need to establish which ones are most likely to deliver value for money in the context of strong competition for finite funding and resources (for example see our Infrastructure Investment Plan for the Isle of Wight). At Lichfields, we work closely with a range of different partners across the country to shape the collective economic narrative, vision and strategy to enable places to thrive. We can help by bringing our extensive experience and track record in supporting our clients to articulate their economic case, secure investment and assess their impact. To find out more, have a look at our new package of services and tools which is specifically designed to help local authorities shape industrial strategies for their area, and get in touch.  

CONTINUE READING

Making an impact: measuring economic contribution in the property sector
By providing the essential investment to support and drive economic growth, we all know that the development industry makes a hugely important contribution to the UK economy. But relatively few organisations can point to specific evidence or tangible examples of the wider benefits delivered by their day-to-day activities and operations. The concept of measuring the social and economic impacts of corporate activities has, however, started to attract greater focus and attention within the development sector. Leading organisations increasingly want to take a strategic perspective of the contribution they make to the national and local economy through their development portfolios and investments. Within a competitive and often crowded marketplace, they are coming to realise that to effectively influence stakeholders requires a clear and compelling narrative, justified by a robust and objective evidence base. At Lichfields, we work with some of the largest and most successful companies in the sector including commercial developers, housebuilders, retailers and industry bodies, to help them assess their economic contribution. Friday we were delighted to launch our most recent collaboration with Landsec, the UK’s largest listed commercial property company, having supported them to measure their sizeable contribution to the UK economy for the first time. The findings show Landsec’s annual contribution to the UK economy through buying, selling, building and managing commercial property.   But with so much to potentially cover and include, where’s the best place to start? I’ve set out some key questions for any organisation thinking about how to measure their contribution: 1) What’s the best way of analysing the value created by an organisation? For large companies, there is often a case to break down activity by specific divisions or geographical trading areas. Some examples include: Company-wide activity (e.g. Landsec’s UK operations); Divisional (or regional) operations (e.g. Barratt David Wilson Southern Region); A portfolio of sites, assets or developments (e.g. Manor Royal Business District); Individual development schemes (e.g. Long Marston Airfield); and Industry-wide activities (e.g. UK house building). 2) Who is the target audience and what are the key messages to convey? This will determine the types of impacts and metrics to explore, as well as the outputs required. Once the added value generated by a business has been quantified, this can be applied in a number of contexts including corporate social responsibility reporting, communicating wider value to stakeholders (such as investors, local councils, government) and providing differentiation from competitors (for example within competitive bidding situations). This could focus on ‘real time’ impacts such as revenue generated for UK plc as well as longer term impacts such as investing in the workforce and local communities (e.g. supporting people to (re)enter the labour market). 3) What input data is available? Think about what kind of data and information is already held in-house (for example on a company ledger or payroll) and what might need to be captured through primary data collection or surveys. For many of our clients when undertaking this exercise for the first time, this can help to shine a light on the type, scale and quality of a wide range of company data and often helps to improve and streamline internal systems going forward. In reality we find that it’s an evolving process, with the range of metrics reported expanding and diversifying over time. Our analytical framework is flexible and scalable, and draws on the latest data and national best practice to consider socio-economic contribution across a range of direct, indirect and wider impacts including creating jobs and expenditure, supporting public resources and services and building sustainable communities (Figure 1). Figure 1: Socio-economic impact framework Source: Lichfields This provides an opportunity to look beyond the obvious metrics (such as number of people directly employed by an organisation) to quantify the value supported across the wider supply chain and economy. For instance, the ‘catalytic’ and place-making role played by major developments, such as kick starting the regeneration of a town centre or unlocking a new piece of transport infrastructure to enhance connectivity and consequently enable an area to secure additional investment. 4) What is the most effective and impactful way of presenting the results? This will partly depend on the intended audience, and it may be that a suite of different outputs are required. We have used our experience and polished suite of graphics tools to communicate key messages in a visually appealing way, through clear and user-friendly outputs such as infographic summaries, interactive tools and creative, engaging reports (some examples below). What’s clear is that more of the development sector’s key players are realising the value that comes from measuring and communicating their total economic impact, and we expect to see a growing appetite over the coming months as government looks to secure new sector deals. At Lichfields we are well placed to help and simplify the process, drawing on our market-leading expertise and unparalleled track record of economic impact assessment, as well as our ‘tried and tested’ tools that have been independently reviewed and verified. Please get in touch to find out more and to discuss how we can help. Image credit: Loop Imaged Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo

CONTINUE READING