Planning matters

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Dockless bikes: development implications of the bike sharing revolution
“When a utopian cycle scheme was launched in Cambridge in 1993, all 300 machines were stolen on the first day; broken down for spares or shipped out by free marketeers quick to spot an opportunity.”[1] A lot has changed since the early days of the bike sharing economy, as described by Iain Sinclair. Or has it? In June 2017, Mobike launched a dockless bike sharing service in Manchester. The Guardian reported that within one month of the 1,000 bikes being introduced to the city, 50 were trashed beyond repair. This compares to just two reports of damaged locks a couple of months after 5,000 were introduced in Singapore.  Despite such setbacks (and questions about locals not understanding how to share), dockless bike sharing schemes seem to be here to stay and are rapidly expanding across cities all over the world, including Paris, Berlin and London. So, what is the future of the bike sharing revolution? Will dockless schemes replace or complement more traditional docked bike schemes, such as London’s Santander Bikes? Can the growth of dockless bikes support higher residential densities? Will wider use reduce the needs for on-site cycle parking and enable ground floor parking areas to be liberated for alternative uses? London’s Boris-bikes Bike sharing schemes are not a new concept. Most hotels, guesthouses and bike shops offer bike hire and have done so for many years; however, what is new is the scale and rapid growth of such schemes. First championed in 2007 by the then Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone, London’s cycle hire scheme was inspired by the success of the Velib network in Paris and was launched in 2010 by Boris Johnson (‘Boris-bikes’). With around 5,000 bicycles and 315 docking stations, the network has since been grown extensively. In London Mayor Sadiq Khan’s term so far, more than 11,500 bikes across 750 docking stations are provided – making a strong start in contributing to his goal of 80 per cent of all journeys in London being made on foot, by bike or using public transport by 2041. Despite the expansion, the scheme is poorly represented outside travel zones 1 and 2, with noticeable gaps in south east London (including Peckham, Greenwich and Dulwich – all of which have no docking stations). Santander Bikes therefore seem to be most suited to supporting shorter trips in central London, rather than serving the needs of the majority of commuters. Growth of dockless bike hire schemes Clutter or convenience? Dockless bikes parked in LB Islington However, popping up in boroughs outside central London, a wide array of dockless bike sharing schemes (including Mobike, Ofo, Urbo and Obike) are now starting to plug the bike sharing gap outside travel zones 1 and 2 – supporting more varied trips and daily commutes across the capital. When launched, many of the boroughs affected were not consulted. Nevertheless, they have had to deal with the growth of such schemes, with some seeking to find a “common approach” to policing dockless bikes. Others (such as LB Hammersmith and Fulham) have removed bikes under highway obstruction notices and require that operators have a signed Memorandum of Understanding in place with the Council, before commencing operations (LB Ealing). Let’s face it – no one wants to see bikes littered across pavements and cluttering the public realm, nor dumped in watercourses, hidden in back gardens or piled high ready to be recycled - not least TfL or the local authorities which have sought for many years to de-clutter our streets and improve residential amenity. Schemes require users to be considerate and operators to manage the expansion of dockless bikes in a way that respects our communities and streets, considering the needs of wheelchair users and the visually impaired. TfL’s Code of Practice for dockless bike hire schemes aims to manage expansion, and encourages operators to engage with TfL and relevant highways authorities to promote safe, considerate and accessible cycle hire schemes. Penalties for inconsiderate parking and designated parking spots with geo-fencing technology are just some of the ways that considerate parking is being encouraged by operators. Whilst it’s good that a number of local authorities are partnering with specific operators, there is potential for matters to become tribal, if a patchwork of different schemes emerge – which could create connectivity problems for users trying to cycle between boroughs partnered with different providers.  Unlocking higher densities and on-site cycle parking provision With the Mayor’s push for higher residential densities in Outer London Boroughs and with many Opportunity Areas having poor public transport accessibility levels (PTAL), bike sharing schemes should be seen as be part of the answer, in supporting higher densities and unlocking the development potential of sites less well-served by public transport. In London, density has long been underpinned by PTAL ratings (which do not take account of bike hire or sharing schemes). This is now starting to change through the design-led approach proposed in the Draft New London Plan and acknowledgement that “higher densities could be supported by maximising the potential of active transport” (para. 3.6.4). The benefits of active transport (i.e. walking and cycling) have been championed as one of the solutions to London’s housing crisis, with active transport accessibility levels (ATAL) promoted as an alternative methodology for underpinning density. Such improvements to an area’s ATAL provide the opportunity to support and revitalise Outer London town centres, by facilitating retail and leisure trips between less well-connected areas and supporting the viability of non-residential and mixed-use developments by improving footfall. Much like car sharing schemes, dockless bike sharing schemes could also be part of the answer when it comes to providing on-site cycle parking provision. Whilst seeking to ensure that everyone living in a new development is able to own a bike is a worthy goal, not everyone wants to/can afford to own one, but then again there are those that own more than one bike for different occasions. Large areas of the ground floor and basements of residential developments are often set aside to provide secure cycle parking. Taking inspiration from the dockless bike sharing revolution, could development-specific bike sharing schemes provide a more efficient space-saving form of bike offering – reducing requirements for on-site cycle parking provision or, at the very least, reducing the vast amounts of dedicated cycle parking space required at ground floor level? In any case, such space is often not fully utilised, as residents prefer to take their bike(s) up to keep in their flats/on their balconies? Such innovative schemes could simultaneously free-up developable space that may be better-used for more active ground floor uses, whilst also providing a cycling option for those people who want to cycle but do not have their own bike. The new London Plan needs to look forward to what is already happening literally on the Mayor’s doorstep. At the moment there seems to be a huge momentum for dockless bike sharing in London, so it will be interesting see how the sector evolves and shapes our urban realm and schemes’ design (assuming the trend lasts). Whilst it remains to be seen how their growth could help unlock higher densities as a general principle, it is apparent that dockless bike sharing schemes are here to stay, widening transport options for those who can and want to get across cities on two wheels. But I for one won’t be selling my bikes – okay, I have to admit I have three -  just yet…  [1] Iain Sinclair, The Last London: True Fictions from an Unreal City, 2017

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Generation Gym: have you been to the gym this week?
Ask the question “have you been to the gym this week?” and more often than not the answer these days will be ‘yes’.  Within my circle of London based friends, the answer is more likely to be, “of course; I did a HIIT session on Monday, ran 5k Tuesday, rest day Wednesday, did a WOD at the local CrossFit Thursday and have a PT session this eve - how about you?” This may make some of you feel exhausted, a bit guilty or even sigh and roll your eyes, but I’m afraid to say I’m the person that will answer “that’s awesome, me too!” It seems in the past few years fitness has developed into something of a social identity - at least among the plugged-in, upper middle class, roughly millennial-age urbanists. On reflection, I can vouch for that; if I’m not working or with my family, I’m almost certainly in the gym, where I have made a good few friends and have now become part of an established community in my local area.  It is a genuine way of life and I am certainly not alone. According to research conducted by Leisure DB, we are officially a nation of gym-goers. The UK Fitness Report has found that UK gym memberships has grown by more than 5% year on year, meaning 1 in 7 of us now use a gym (or at least pay to be a member of one). It seems the current generation of 20- to 30-somethings are knowledgeable and care about health and what they are eating and drinking, right from where produce is sourced to understanding its nutritional value better.  This has recently been evidenced by various surveys, showing that this generation is generally  drinking less alcohol than our predecessors, with even a growing proportion thinking of completely abstaining from alcohol altogether.  Times are changing and there is a generational shift from the baby boomers in terms of how spare time is used and valued.  The fitness market has of course latched onto this rise in the time being spent in the gym and, over the past decade, there has been a significant boom in not only the number of gyms but also the types of gym – a trend evidenced by Colliers International in their 2017 review of the Central London Gym market. Constant changes in market trends and how the property market quickly adapts to meet new demands can be observed.  So now not dissimilar to how the retail sector has had to adapt (large format stores giving way to convenience and the likes of Aldi and Lidl providing more variety for those shopping to a budget), the fitness market is now following suit – convenience AND knowledge are king to the consumer.  No longer is the market dominated by the big, standard format gym providers like Virgin Active and Cannons, with their standard gym formats and pricey fixed yearly contracts. We are now seeing the rise of budget gyms such as Pure Gym and easyGym (yes even easyJet has recognised there’s good business to be had here) offering cheap monthly/pay-as-you-go memberships, as well as the rise of specialist studios and spaces - YourZone, Barrys Bootcamp, Crossfit gyms and Soul Cycle to name but a few.  The word ‘budget’ might conjure up images of paying for the bare minimum along the lines of budget airlines easyJet and Ryanair, where every little extra such as signing up to a class, using the pool or asking for a towel will cost extra, so by the time it’s all added up, the more expensive option might just as well have been paid for?   Pure Gym from £19.99 per month     Fitness for Less £15.99 per month             easyGym £8.99 per month       Well apparently not; ‘budget’ gyms have all the latest equipment in conveniently located spaces, full suites of classes and more often than not, they are open 24/7.  They may have slightly less staff hanging around than the usual gym, no in-built coffee shop or chill-out areas, no free toiletries and the necessity of taking your own towel and padlock but the cost of going to the gym is not an excuse anymore!  Budget gyms account for the biggest area of growth in the UK fitness industry.  There are now more 500 of them, accounting for more than an estimated 35% of all gym memberships. As well as budget, there has also been the rise in the more specialist and boutique studios/gyms, some zoning in on the latest technologies and fads taking hold in the fitness business.  A prime example is the rise of High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT), with the subsequent rise of franchises such as Barry’s Bootcamp; clients pay a fair-sized sum for the privilege of being shouted at by trainers, over loud music and in the dark. They burn a silly amount of calories in a packed room for 50 minutes. There is something for everyone out there now (although you may have to dig a little deeper into your pockets!). This is not to say the days of the ‘old school’ gym providers such as Virgin Active and David Lloyd are over; there is still a dedicated group of gym-goers in the market who are willing to pay more and even travel a little further for all the extras.  Given the competition presented by the budget gyms, Virgin Active have recently announced the sale of a number of UK/London clubs so it can focus on the upgrade of its luxury ‘Collection’ clubs.  So what does this mean for the development industry? Accommodation-wise and right now, any space - whether it is a 50sqm ground floor shell, old industrial shed, basement or even rooftop space – could be a gym, and potentially a new community hub.  It used to be the case that developers would often look at left-over, unusable and/ or least valuable space in a scheme and count out gym use, either due to size (too small) or lack of need (there was already a gym nearby).  Well not anymore; the market is much more flexible and tangible now.  Generation gym – being all-knowledgeable, highly demanding, and wanting to try all new fads whilst still seeking the all-important convenience factor – love choice and variety, with some choosing to be members of more than one gym (as they offer completely different things).  In fact, generation gym, particularly in London, would form a large part of the group labelled as generation rent – the same group that is driving the Build to Rent market and more often than not, that expect gyms to be a part of the purpose-built facilities they are buying into – again, convenience is key! The new gyms don’t need large floor areas so when developers are formulating their next project and considering options for uses or what to do with that basement or compromised units why not see if a gym or studio could make best use of that space. A gym/studio could even make a good temporary meanwhile use. With local authorities giving increased consideration to health impacts and benefits a gym could make just as much sense as any other commercial option. Incorporating a gym could also assist in making a genuine case to local authority planners that the facility will become a valued community asset.   

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